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TEXAS TOUGH EASY ROSES

Perfect for Houston!

The roses I plant are hardy, tough, beautiful . . . AND easy. I’ve planted them for years. I don’t prepare the beds or spray – and rarely fertilize. Occasionally, I water them. And, I have dogs, who love to mark tall things, daily.

There are hundreds of types of roses. I only plant those that do NOT need any help. Fussy plants are not for me.

Finding the right type for drought, humidity, Houston summer sun, and the occasional super freeze that all occur here from time to time can be a challenge, as most gardeners know. Most roses don’t like our summers, leave 'em be, they’ll flower again soon enough.

Roses handle varied conditions far better than many other blooming plants, and they will do so nearly all year here, blooming in winter-time when little else does except annuals low to the ground.

There is a profound array of colors, scents and needs associated with this magical flower. What to plant that will fulfill the promises found on the labels? Houston‘s zones vary; what works in Tomball may not in League City.

Buy only from known rose sources that have tried out the plants that they sell, or shop locally owned specialized nurseries. Ask questions.

The chain nurseries often mislabel theirs IF labeled at all, and they do not have a staff that is informed. They force feed them too much, to keep them blooming, until you put them in your own yard.

Basic Rose Types: floribunda, hybrid tea, grandiflora, climbers, and shrubs. They need good sunlight (4-5 hours), and know how big your rose will ultimately be and who he is next to! Two to 10 years down the road all perennials will be growing and thriving. Bougainvilleas, agaves and cacti, for example, require the gardner to have knowledge, since they have thorns that don’t play well with others.

TOP 4 ROSES
WAY TOO EASY TO BELIEVE!

Mutabilis – large bush up to 10 feet tall, a great one to hide fencing and keep out drifters. Sulpher/ orange/pink /crimson single blooms nearly all year. Nonscented. Can manage shade.

Drift – short, showy, compact, a variety of sweet colors. Scented. Max 3 feet tall by 3 feet wide.

Cinco de Mayo – orange/violet/rust/blush on same plant. Scented. Up to 4-5 feet tall.

Belinda’s Dream – tall, shrubbish, to 8 feet, multi-petaled, offering a perfectly shaped pink rose. Delicious fragrance. Perfect for corners.

Other likes: Pavonia, Peggy Martin, Martha Gonzales, Iceberg, Duchesse de Brabant.

Resources

The Antique Rose Emporium
9300 Lueckemeyer,
Brenham
979-836-5548
weAREroses.com

The Arbor Gate
15635 FM 2920 Rd,
Tomball
281-351-8851
www.arborgate.com

Jeff Law is owner of Kabloom Landscaping (www.kabloomlandscaping.com, 713-256-0398). He is a landscape and renovation artist with more than 25 years of experience.

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